News

Congratulations to Roanoke College's 2013 Mathematical Contest in Modeling team!
Ed Hrinya, Jared Meadows and Kat Jansen earned a Meritorious rating, placing in the top 1% of the 5636 teams from 17 countries. The team designed the optimal brownie pan.


About the program

With classes that develop critical thinking skills and a range of advanced coursework, the mathematics program can be tailored to suit specific student interests and goals.

Why study math at Roanoke?

  • Uncover the unexpected. When you ask math students about their department, you hear words like unexpected, team, family, community and fun.
  • Be ready for anything. Because of their unique training in real-world problem-solving, Roanoke's math majors also describe themselves as superbly prepared to take on the challenges of graduate school and the workplace.
  • Get serious. Math students meet regularly for tea and conversation, celebrate Pi Day every March 14 (or 3.14) and bring Elvis the Calculus Dog to campus. They also have competed in COMAP's Mathematical Contest in Modeling with impressive results-earning recognition as a top tier team and beating competition from thousands of universities, including ivy league schools like Harvard and Yale.

Explore math firsthand

There are many opportunities for firsthand learning in the math major:

What's next

Graduate school? Roanoke's math graduates have been accepted for graduate-level study at such schools as Clemson, Cornell, John Hopkins, North Carolina State and University of Virginia. Learn more.

Career? Roanoke's math students have a great track record of finding success in the job market. Recent grads are working at such places as Motorola, Merck Laboratories, U.S. Bureau of Census, Envision EMI,  Mathematica Policy Research and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Learn more.

Program requirements

Math major

Math minor

 
Ingram retires after 34 years teaching math and computer science at Roanoke

Ingram retires after 34 years teaching math and computer science at Roanoke

Dr. Jane Ingram, who was chair of the computer science, physics and mathematics department at Roanoke, helped to start the College's computer science major.

See all related stories

 

"My professors set up an internship for me with NASA that helped me land my first job. What helps me do my job, though, is the broad-based education I got at Roanoke. I don't only need to analyze numbers; I need to be able to present my findings. Because I have a liberal arts education, I'm known as the math person who can actually talk to other people."

- Ashley MacFarlane, ManTech, Reliability Engineer supporting US Army Test and Evaluation Command